Posts tagged “Lighthouses

Story Behind the Photo: Pigeon Point Light Station

Pigeon Point Light Station, Pescadero, CA

On a trip to explore the coast of California, my husband and I took our time driving south along the Pacific Coast Highway taking in the scenery. While I expected Big Sur to be beautiful, I was just as taken with the beautiful rocky shoreline between San Francisco and Monterey. Pescadero especially was beautiful, with Bean Hollow State Beach as a stand out thanks to its “pebble beach“. Another beautiful spot in Pescadero is at the Pigeon Point Light Station. When we turned towards the light station from the highway, the parking area was full, so we drove a little further along the coastal road looking for a place to turn around. While we meandered along the winding road, a huge mass of Ice Plants appeared that seemed to go right up to the Pacific Ocean itself. I decided to get out and snap a few photos, and then turned to see this beautiful view of the light station. As it turns out, this view from our remote stop in the road was much better than anything I could have had from the parking lot at the light station itself. Every now and then a detour is a good thing!

Buy a print | Pacific Coast Highway Photos | Lighthouse Photos


News: New Photo Featured as ‘Photo of the Day’ Online ~ Pigeon Point Light Station

Pigeon Point Light StationLast fall I was honored to have several of my photos selected as a Photo of the Day for Light and Composition Magazine. I am excited to announce that several additional photos have been selected to appear in the coming weeks. See the first of these new photos, “Pigeon Point Light Station” featured on Monday, May 2, 2011.

This photo was previously featured on March 11, 2011,  here in the PhotoBlog. “Pigeon Point Light Station”  is also now entered as a contestant for Photo of the Month for May 2011. You may vote for it by visiting the link below and ‘liking’ through Facebook, ‘retweeting’ through Twitter, ‘liking’ on StumbleUpon or by making a comment.

Photo of the Day | May 2, 2011 | Pigeon Point Light Station by Elizabeth Brown


Story Behind the Photo: Pigeon Point Light Station

Pigeon Point Light Station, Pescadero, CA

On a trip to explore the coast of California last year, my husband and I took our time driving south along the Pacific Coast Highway taking in the scenery. While I expected Big Sur to be beautiful, I was just as taken with the beautiful rocky shoreline between San Francisco and Monterey. Pescadero especially was beautiful, with Bean Hollow State Beach as a stand out thanks to its “pebble beach“. Another beautiful spot in Pescadero is at the Pigeon Point Light Station. When we turned towards the light station from the highway, the parking area was full, so we drove a little further along the coastal road looking for a place to turn around. While we meandered along the winding road, a huge mass of Ice Plants appeared that seemed to go right up to the Pacific Ocean itself. I decided to get out and snap a few photos, and then turned to see this beautiful view of the light station. As it turns out, this view from our remote stop in the road was much better than anything I could have had from the parking lot at the light station itself. Every now and then a detour is a good thing!

Buy a print | Pacific Coast Highway Photos | Lighthouse Photos

Update: This photo was featured on May 2, 2011, as the Photo of the Day by the online photography magazine, Light and Composition Magazine. See the photo online and vote for it as a contestant for the Photo of the Month for May 2011.


Story Behind the Photo: Ocracoke Lighthouse Decorated for Christmas

Ocracoke Lighthouse Decorated for Christmas, Ocracoke, NC

After growing up spending my summers in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, as an adult my family started spending Christmases there every few years. While it can be very cold and windy, it’s a marvelous time to visit and you seem to have the beach all to yourself. The last time we held our Christmas gathering in the Outer Banks was in 2007, and the weather was downright beautiful. Sunny with highs in the low 60’s, the unseasonable weather was perfect for an afternoon to visit some of our favorite spots. We spent the day working our way south from Nags Head, ending our day at the Ocracoke Light Station on Ocracoke Island. It was a delight to see the lighthouse decorated for the season and it was the perfect ending to our day. This photo brings back memories of a wonderful time spent with family, and a truly Merry Christmas.

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Story Behind the Photo: Ocracoke Light Station

Ocracoke Light Station, Ocracoke, NC

Ocracoke Island is part of the barrier islands that form the Outer Banks of North Carolina.  Only accessible by sea or air, the island is a favorite tourist destination via the free ferry service from several different locations in the Outer Banks. On the southern end of the island is the quaint village of Ocracoke and the Ocracoke Light Station, both on the National Register of Historic Places since 1977. The Ocracoke Light Station is the oldest operating lighthouse in North Carolina, built in 1823 in the Ocracoke Inlet. Standing 75 feet tall and shining 14 miles out to sea, the Ocracoke Light Station acts as a harbor light, emitting a constant fixed beam. While other light houses along the Outer Banks are known for their distinctive stripes and patterns, Ocracoke is just as easily recognized by it’s simple all-over white.

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Story Behind the Photo: Cape Hatteras Light Station

 

Cape Hatteras LighthouseThe Cape Hatteras Light Station, one of the most famous symbols of North Carolina, is found on the Outer Banks in the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. It is the tallest brick lighthouse in the US at 210 feet tall with a whopping 248 steps to the top, the equivalent of a 12 story building. If that wasn’t enough, the lighthouse is also the tallest brick structure to ever be moved. After 129 years of coastal erosion, the lighthouse was within 100 feet of the Atlantic Ocean in 1999. It was very carefully moved 2,900 feet inland in to protect it over the course of 23 days. Click here to buy a print and view the entire collection